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Racial Injustice and Everything in-between

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere” - Martin Luther King Jr


The last few days have been emotional, to say the least. I have cried in sadness, roared in rage, screamed in frustration and I have come to a conclusion that I can not adequately express how I am feeling during these unprecedented times. Everywhere I turned I could not escape the harsh reality of injustice, racism and inequality. I watched from my screen as traumatic events, one after the other unfolded.


George Floyd, aged 46, died after being arrested by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Footage of the arrest, circulated the media on the 25th May, showing a white police officer, Derek Chauvin, kneeling on his neck, whilst pinned to the floor. One of the last statements he made before his death, was “I can’t breathe”. Pleading for his life, this man died as a result of racial injustice, but he is not alone:


Ahmaud Arbery

Breonna Taylor

Belly Mujinga

Sandra Bland

Eric Garner

Anthony Hill

Christian Taylor

Christopher Davis

Alton Sterling

Eric Reason

George Floyd

and so many more names that will forever be in our prayers. To question the existence of racism is simply ignorant and to have to justify why Black Lives Matter is obscured because these names are real. We are living in a time where we are forced to question the values and beliefs of the very people that govern the system that we live in. To ignore the trauma of racism on the Black community is the same as ignoring our pain and cutting off our mics when we shout. Institutional racism is affecting friends, families and work colleagues and we need to put a stop to it. We are tired, we are tired of singing the same song, we are tired of injustice, WE ARE TIRED OF BEING TIRED!


The Black Lives Matter hashtags have re-ignited a flame in the community that has been lit one too many times and people are angry. Until people in positions of power take effective action, then we can not rebuild the corrupt system we are funding. As long as the people who create and deliver government policy are not representations of the black community then our future will continue to be held ransom to those who do not care about it. We need to start doing the following:

Investing in our people

Investing in our businesses,

Investing in our future generation,

So that we can be placed in positions of power to make a change.

So here is what you can do


Sign the petitions

Take action and every signature represents a voice saying no to racism

Donate

There are charities and organisations that you can help fund, to actively fight against racial injustice.


Protest Safely

Stand with others in a peaceful protest in various locations in London and various locations this week.


Be Educated

Read…Read and Read! I encourage you to educate yourself on black history and speak to people with a willingness to learn. There are so many books, articles and other resources out there to access


Be Vocal

Motion creates movement, speak out and let your voice be heard

Relevant Resources

Charities and funds


Black Lives Matter

The Bail Project

The Liberty Fund

Reclaim the Block

I Run With Maud

Campaign Zero

Unicorn Riot

American Civil Liberties Union

Stand Up To Racism UK

Petitions to sign

Justice for George Floyd

Justice for Ahmaud Arbery

Justice for Belly Mujinga

Justice for Breonna Taylor

Books and resources to read


- Ways to help (via Black Lives Matter)

- 75 things white people can do for racial injustice (via Medium)

  • Why I’m No longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge⁣⁣⁣

  • I’m Still Here by Austin Channing Brown

  • Dark Days by James Baldwin

  • Diversify by June Sarpong

  • How To Be Antiracist by Ibran X. Kendi

  • Don’t Touch My Hair by Emma Tabiri

  • White Supremacy and Me by Layla F. Saad

  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander

  • Freedom Is A Constant Struggle by Angela Davis

  • They Can’t Kill Us All by Wesley Lowery

  • Your Silence Will Not Protect You by Audre Lord

  • White Girls by Hilton Als

  • Brit-ish by Afuah Hirsh

  • Black and British: A Forgotten History by David Olusoga

  • The Good Immigrant, edited by Nikesh Shukla

Written by

Yours Sincerely

Joan Idowu, CEO of Several Seats




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